‘Natural Born Clickers’ Study

Starcom MediaVest Group

logo_com_7603The study illustrates that heavy clickers represent just 6% of the online population yet account for 50% of all display ad clicks. While many online media companies use click-through rate as an ad negotiation currency, the study shows that heavy clickers are not representative of the general public. In fact, heavy clickers skew towards Internet users between the ages of 25-44 and households with an income under $40,000.

Further preliminary Starcom data suggests no correlation between display ad clicks and brand metrics, and show no connection between measured attitude towards a brand and the number of times an ad for that brand was clicked. The research presentation suggests that when digital campaigns have a branding objective, optimizing for high click rates does not necessarily improve campaign performance.

“Natural Born Clickers shows us that we can’t count on click-through rate as our primary success metric for display ads; Starcom is more reliant on shifts in brand attitude metrics and analytics tying on-line exposure to sales as the true measures of online advertising efficacy.”
"Ultimately, judging a campaign’s effectiveness by clicks can be detrimental because it overlooks the importance of branding while simultaneously drawing conclusions from a sub-set of people who may not be representative of the target audience.”

powerpoint  Download the electronic version of Natural Born Clickers free of charge.

Google: The Hollow Echo of a Click

Google co-founder Larry Page announced the company was rolling out a new product that will allow its advertisers to pay only when they acquire a new customer.
Microsoft is also pushing beyond clicks. On Feb.25, the company unveiled an initiative that allows advertisers effectively to pay based on the number of people who watch a video, provide their e-mail address, or take some other desired action.

 

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